How To Speak Startup

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Deanna Lawrence:

Love this… gets right to heart of what it takes!

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

Hang with startup kids long enough, and you’ll notice that they have their own language. No, bro, it’s a SaaS play in the on-demand food space. Think of it as the Uber for gluten-free Whole Foods delivery, ok? It never ends: We’re actively raising, but really want to make sure that we hit investor-board fit before product-market sync, you know?

This can be confusing.

However, TechCrunch is here to demystify startup lingo into a more common lingua franca. The startup kids, after all, are worth trying to understand. One or two of them might even build something usable.

So, without further ado, I give you How To Speak Startup:

Acqui-hire – A strategy for acquiring talent pioneered by Google in the mid-2000s that happens when a bigger company thinks your team is good but your idea is hilariously bad. Also called a “signing bonus.”

Failure – A bad thing…

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Pew: Facebook User Growth Slowed As Others Gained, But Still Has Most Engaged Users

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Deanna Lawrence:

More Online Americans Using Multiple Social Media Sites-

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

Facebook is still the most popular social network, but its growth has slowed in the U.S., according to a new report out this morning from the Pew Research Center. Meanwhile, more Americans are now using multiple social media sites, allowing platforms like Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and LinkedIn to all achieve significant increases in user numbers over the past year, the report found.

It’s been said for some time that Facebook has reached “critical mass” here in the U.S., and these new figures go further to support that claim – the social network remains the most popular, but its membership levels here have seen little change from where they were in 2013. One exception to this is with the “older” adults demographic.

For the first time, more than half (56%) of internet users ages 65 and older use Facebook. Yes: grandma and grandpa are now on Facebook.

That brings to mind a recent article…

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Facebook, Google, And Twitter’s War For App Install Ads

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Deanna Lawrence:

Just too many apps.
Future solutions will focus on what YOU select as important, helping you filter out all of the noise from your connected world.

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

[tc_dropcap] An unexpected consequence of our love apps is that now there’s just too damn many of them. The app stores are overcrowded, leaving developers desperate for a way to get their games and utilities discovered. That is why the app install ad has become the lifeblood of the mobile platform business.[/tc_dropcap]

Big brands aren’t the only ones to suck up to anymore. No one buys a car or Coca-Cola on their phone, at least not yet, so proving the return on investment of mobile ads to these businesses is tough. There is one thing people will instantly plop down a few bucks for on the small screen, though: Apps.

Too Many App[tc_rr_related_video] [tc_rr_crunchbase]

Lured by billions in app install ad spend per quarter and hoping to grow that pie, Facebook, Twitter, and Google have stepped up. But to win those dollars, they have to buddy up to developers.

Facebook and Twitter really have…

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IoT platforms and the product iteration argument

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Deanna Lawrence:

The Internet of Things (IoT) offers an important point of communication and the ability to learn about consumer lifestyle.
For consumers, the ability to manage all of these connected things is going to be a challenge. FridgeNality accounts for IoT and manages very smart connections.

Originally posted on Gigaom:

When it comes to the smart home, big names like Nest and Dropcam have gotten most of the attention due to their product success and lucrative acquisition figures. But as impressive as these products have been, there are a multitude of other unknown products ranging from door locks to basic thermostats that require connectivity and back end cloud services.

Stepping into this market niche are a wave of Internet of Things (IoT) platform providers that work with manufacturers to provide both hardware (modules with a processor and a wifi chip) and software services like iOS/Android integration, APIs, and cloud services. While big players like GE and Cisco likely will make a play for this space, particularly on the industrial side, the early startups include Electric Imp, Ayla Networks, Xively and Arrayent.

Sexy air conditioning

It’s a lot less sexy than Nest, but for manufacturers that don’t have internal engineering teams…

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#makingAdifference Shinola: One Detroit Man’s Quest to Revive American Manufacturing

Via Mashable

Twitter Pollutes The Timeline

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Deanna Lawrence:

“A variety of signals”…relevant and interesting or noise?

Originally posted on TechCrunch:

If your Twitter stream is looking a little more crap random than usual there’s a concrete reason for that: Twitter has made a behind-the-scenes change which means it’s algorithmically adulterating the mix of content you see. Not that they’re putting it like that, of course.

The specific change in how your Twitter timeline operates allows for the company to inject additional content into your feed from other users you don’t follow. This is in addition to promoted tweet advertising content — you still get that thrust into your feed too.

Yesterday the company added the following paragraph to a Help Center page which details exactly how far it’s moving the goal posts here:

Additionally, when we identify a Tweet, an account to follow, or other content that’s popular or relevant, we may add it to your timeline. This means you will sometimes see Tweets from accounts you don’t follow. We select each Tweet using a variety of signals, including how popular it is…

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Twitter is TV

Deanna Lawrence:

I can’t imagine our world advancing in a more positive direction without Twitter. #Connected

Originally posted on Quartz:

Rick Perry mugshot on Twitter no-caption

When Twitter was still Twttr, before tweets were even limited to 140 characters, the company’s founders had a crucial decision to make. Jack Dorsey’s original vision was that users could only ever have one status at a time, like an away message. Ev Williams argued that all status updates should display in chronological order, like tiny blog posts.

Williams, of course, won out. He hacked together the original prototype of Twitter using code from his previous blogging startup, Blogger, according to Nick Bilton’s book Hatching Twitter. The first updates are still preserved on the web:

“setting up my twitlog”

“hmmm… will it work?”

“Checking if this works”

“Wondering if it’s safe to leave the office. (sounds like a torential downpour)”

“Driving home”

“Jamming to mia. In car”

“Wondering whatls for dinner”

For better and worse, that is what Twitter became: update after update after update, some eventually much more profound…

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